Structural Building Inspections

The backbone of any building consists of foundation and the structural design. Concrete, wood or steel. Very simple if you look at it that way.

The structural backbone of all buildings is made of concrete, wood or steel. Structural building components, like roof trusses, are custom designed and built in specialized manufacturing environments then delivered to the jobsite where framers install them along with permanent bracing to create the overall structural system. Roof trusses are used in all types of construction, from residential to commercial to agricultural, and are assembled from structural framing lumber and fastened at the joints with metal connector plates.

Uplift: ASCE/SEI 7-10, Minimum Design Loads of Buildings and Other Structures, lists two methods for calculating wind pressures: Main Wind Force Resisting System (MWFRS) and Components & Cladding (C&C). This guide will provide information to assist the building designer in deciding upon the appropriate analysis method for uplift due to wind loading.

Fire rating: A fire endurance rating may be mandated by code for many of the applications where trusses could be used in floor/ceiling, roof/ceiling or in attic separation applications. There will be instances when materials and assemblies used in a building may not be readily available from prescriptive tables and tests. Theoretical methods have been developed that offer an alternative to full scale fire tests.

Sprinkler systems: Fire sprinkler systems may be used as an effective method of providing fire protection, as well as being highly compatible with Metal Plate Connected Wood Truss (MPCWT) systems. When fire sprinkler systems are used with truss systems, it is essential to design the trusses to carry the additional dead load and required live loads imposed by the fire sprinkler system, as well as to comply with standards. for fire protection. This guide covers basic information that should be considered by the Building Designer and Truss Designer in designing the truss system for use with a sprinkler system.

Structural building components: like floor trusses, are custom designed and built in specialized manufacturing environments then delivered to the jobsite where framers install them along with permanent bracing to create the overall structural system. Floor trusses are used in all types of construction, from residential to commercial to agricultural, and are assembled from structural framing lumber and fastened at the joints with metal connector plates.

Masonry veneer: While the use of brick veneer supported by Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses (MPCWT) is not covered by the prescriptive methods of either the International Building Code (IBC) or the IRC, code compliant use of MPCWT to support brick veneer can be accomplished and can be applied to many different situations utilizing MPCWT’s. This guide focuses specifically on creating a code compliant connection where exterior masonry veneer is located on the gable end at the transition from a wider section of a building to a narrower section

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Heel blocking: is a commonly used method to transfer in-plane lateral loads from the braced wall panel to the roof diaphragm. Heel blocking is installed between roof truss heels at the top of the exterior wall. Structural engineers may have questions regarding the prescriptive code requirements or the capacity of commonly used heel blocking to achieve a desired load transfer. This guide reviews the basics of determining whether a heel block is structurally adequate

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Sill plates: supporting metal plate connected wood trusses (MPCWT) are sometimes cantilevered over the foundation (parallel or perpendicular to the sill) to align the exterior sheathing with the foundation insulation. When this is done, there is a potential for a discontinuity between the exterior wall above and the foundation. This design guide will show when sill plates may be cantilevered without requiring design of the trusses for a cantilevered condition.

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Long span trusses: are 60' or greater in length. A long span truss can pose a greater risk to installers because the dimensions and weight of the truss itself can create instability, buckling and collapse of the truss if it is not handled, installed and braced properly. Long span trusses can be installed safely and efficiently but they require more detailed safety and handling measures than short span trusses.

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Rigid Frame: Its is that type of structure in which the members are joined together by rigid joints e.g. welded joints.

  • Truss (Pin connected joints)

A type of structure formed by members in triangular form, the resulting figure is called a truss. In truss joints are pin connected and loads are applied at joints. No shear force & bending moment are produced. Only axial compression and axial tension is to be determined while analyzing a truss.

  • Beam

Beam is a flexural member of the structure. It is subjected to transverse loading such as vertical loads, and gravity loads. These loads create shear and bending within the beam.

  • Columns

A long vertical member mostly subjected to compressive loads is called column

  • Strut

A compressive member of a structure is called strut.

  • Beam-Column

A structural member subjected to compression as well as flexure is called beam column

  • Grid

A network of beam intersecting each other at right angles and subjected to vertical loads is called grid.

  • Cables and Arches

Cables are usually suspended at their ends and are allowed to sag. The forces are then pure tension and are directed along the axis of the cable. Arches are similar to cables except hath they are inverted. They carry compressive loads that are directed along the axis of the arch.

  • Plates and Slabs

Plates are three dimensional flat structural components usually made of metal that are often found in floors and roofs of structures. Slabs are similar to plates except that they are usually made of concrete.